Artist, Photographer and Foodie

Picture of the Day Winner : Feb 22, 2016

Model Mayhem Picture of the Day Winner : Eric Courtney, Photographer, Feb 22, 2016

Naomi May

Photographer: Eric Courtney
Model: Naomi May
Makeup: Sabrina Williams
Hair: Sabrina Williams
Shot in May, 2014; Model Mayhem Pic of the Day honors today
Twitter and Instagram: @SquaredEric

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52 Week Photography Challenge, Week 1: Selfie

Eric Courtney

52 Week Photography Challenge, Week 1: Selfie

So I committed to this 52 week photo challenge thing and dragged a few people with me.  Out of the four I dragged with me, only one person dropped out without posting a Week 1 photo; not bad.  I was willing to do it alone, but it is nice to know others will be along for the voyage — and hopefully we can keep each other motivated.  We shall see.

So for Week One, the theme was Start things off right with a “selfie!” Explore the self-timer setting on your camera.  I’m not a big fan of being in front of the camera, but I am also not afraid of hamming it up a little when the camera is pointing at me.  I though about prepping a light setup for a studio image, but then I thought I would just keep it simple for week one.  Then I can go crazy at Week 52 when we take our final image of the challenge which is a return to the theme: Self Portrait.  So instead of setting up a tripod and fixing the focus for and area I would be in shortly after clicking the shutter, I instead mounted my D90 [Nikon] on a monopod and actively fired shots at myself at a focal length of 35mm (1/15, f4.5, ISO800).

The above images are the result of my crash session.  I couldn’t choose just one, so I chose a nice pleasant image of me smiling along with a maniacal and seemingly unstable expression to contrast my mood.  Isn’t he cute?

Next week our theme is Shoot a beautiful landscape and share it with the world. Find a nice foreground and don’t forget the sky.  Hope fully you will come back and see what I have then.  Thanks for visiting.  – Eric Courtney

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Model Mayhem Photographer of the Day, November 1, 2015

Model Mayhem Photographer of the Day, November 1, 2015

11_01_2015photog_mm

 

Photographer: Eric Courtney
Model: Heidi Ramirez
Makeup: Tabi Belaunzaran
Hair: Sean Alian
Shot in November, 2011; Model Mayhem Pic of the Day honors today
Twitter and Instagram: @SquaredEric

Day of The Dead as defined by Wikipedia

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican ancestry living in other places, especially the United States. It is acknowledged internationally in many other cultures. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008 the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.[1]

The holiday is sometimes called Día de los Muertos[2][3] in Anglophone countries, a back-translation of its original name, Día de Muertos. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a public holiday. Prior to Spanish colonization in the 16th century, the celebration took place at the beginning of summer. Gradually it was associated with October 31, November 1 and November 2 to coincide with the Western Christian triduum of Allhallowtide: All Saints’ Eve, All Saints’ Day, and All Souls’ Day.[4][5] Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. Visitors also leave possessions of the deceased at the graves.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world, being absorbed within other deep traditions for honoring the dead. It has become a national symbol and as such is taught (for educational purposes) in the nation’s schools. Many families celebrate a traditional “All Saints’ Day” associated with the Catholic Church.

Originally, the Day of the Dead as such was not celebrated in northern Mexico, where it was unknown until the 20th century because its indigenous people had different traditions. The people and the church rejected it as a day related to syncretizing pagan elements with Catholic Christianity. They held the traditional ‘All Saints’ Day‘ in the same way as other Christians in the world. There was limited Mesoamerican influence in this region, and relatively few indigenous inhabitants from the regions of Southern Mexico, where the holiday was celebrated. In the early 21st century in northern Mexico, Día de Muertos is observed because the Mexican government made it a national holiday based on educational policies from the 1960s; it has introduced this holiday as a unifying national tradition based on indigenous traditions.[6][7][8]

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration is similar to other culture’s observances of a time to honor the dead. The Spanish tradition included festivals and parades, as well as gatherings of families at cemeteries to pray for their deceased loved ones at the end of the day.

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Photographer: Eric Courtney

 

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Model Mayhem Pic of the Day, November 1, 2015

11_1_2015pod_mm

Model: Heidi Ramirez
Makeup: Tabi Belaunzaran
Hair: Sean Alian
Tog: Eric Courtney
Shot in November, 2011; Model Mayhem Pic of the Day honors today
Twitter and Instagram: @SquaredEric

Day of The Dead as defined by Wikipedia

Day of the Dead (SpanishDía de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican ancestry living in other places, especially the United States. It is acknowledged internationally in many other cultures. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008 the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.[1]

The holiday is sometimes called Día de los Muertos[2][3] in Anglophone countries, a back-translation of its original name, Día de Muertos. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a public holiday. Prior to Spanish colonization in the 16th century, the celebration took place at the beginning of summer. Gradually it was associated with October 31, November 1 and November 2 to coincide with the Western Christian triduum of AllhallowtideAll Saints’ EveAll Saints’ Day, and All Souls’ Day.[4][5] Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skullsmarigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. Visitors also leave possessions of the deceased at the graves.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world, being absorbed within other deep traditions for honoring the dead. It has become a national symbol and as such is taught (for educational purposes) in the nation’s schools. Many families celebrate a traditional “All Saints’ Day” associated with the Catholic Church.

Originally, the Day of the Dead as such was not celebrated in northern Mexico, where it was unknown until the 20th century because its indigenous people had different traditions. The people and the church rejected it as a day related to syncretizing pagan elements with Catholic Christianity. They held the traditional ‘All Saints’ Day‘ in the same way as other Christians in the world. There was limited Mesoamerican influence in this region, and relatively few indigenous inhabitants from the regions of Southern Mexico, where the holiday was celebrated. In the early 21st century in northern Mexico, Día de Muertos is observed because the Mexican government made it a national holiday based on educational policies from the 1960s; it has introduced this holiday as a unifying national tradition based on indigenous traditions.[6][7][8]

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration is similar to other culture’s observances of a time to honor the dead. The Spanish tradition included festivals and parades, as well as gatherings of families at cemeteries to pray for their deceased loved ones at the end of the day.

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Photographer: Eric Courtney

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Eric Courtney – Model Mayhem Pinup of the Week Winner

Pinup of the Week Eric CourtneyEric Courtney – Model Mayhem Pinup of the Week Winner
Model: Andrea Davis
Post Work:  Eric Courtney
Makeup and Hair: Model
Photography: Eric Courtney
Shot in April, 2011; Model Mayhem Photographer of the Day honors today
Twitter and Instagram: @SquaredEric

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